Barnet Ruderman’s bookstore and publishing house at 71 Hanbury Street, off Brick Lane, was a key address for a generation of East End radicals.

Ruderman was a penniless teenager when he arrived in Whitechapel from Lithuania in the 1880s. Years of yeshiva studies had left him ill-equipped to survive in late Victorian London, but he earned a living from tailoring and then moved on to publishing, Yiddish journalism and book-selling. Along the way he also published a series of Yiddish postcards attacking the autocracy of Tsar Nicholas II. This one shows scenes of imprisonment, flogging, summary execution and the serpent of tyranny wrapped around the lifeless body of a woman. Ruderman’s memoirs of the Jewish socialist movement in England were serialised in the Yiddish press of the 1920s but have yet to be translated.


Like any migrant community, Russian Jewish immigrants to Britain kept a close eye on events in their homeland. This was true throughout the late 19th century, and even more so in the 1900s and 1910s as anti-Tsarist protest turned into revolution.

David Mazower, the well-known cultural historian and broadcaster, has drawn together a series of fascinating objects and images illustrating this that he discusses in the March 2017 issue of our magazine The Cable. For your copy send a cheque for £4.70 (magazine cost £3.50 plus £1.20 postage) payable to JEECS to JEECS, PO Box 57317, London, E1 3WG.

 

Latest news

  • Harking back through the centuries

    News that a change of use application to turn the historic Whitechapel Bell Foundry into a boutique hotel has been submitted to Tower Hamlets Council has prompted us to resurrect this interesting short article by the late Philip Walker z"l, revealing a mysterious Jewish link, from our magazine The Cable, originally published in 2013. To find out more about the plans for Read More
  • Newsletter: January 2019.

        From Clive Bettington, JEECS chairman   1. Isaac Rosenberg Statue I continue working on the above project as I want to ensure that the statue commemorating Rosenberg, the acclaimed East End artist and poet who is recognised as one of the finest poets of the Great War, is erected this year. JEECS has to continue until the project Read More
  • Nelson Street on Wikipedia

    The beautiful East London Centre Synagogue in Nelson Street (30-40 Nelson Street, E1 2DS) now features on Wikipedia, with an entry that draws in part from an article in JEECS magazine, The Cable. Read More
  • JEECS Newsletter August 2018

    From Clive Bettington, JEECS chairman        1. Email address change Clive Bettington’s new email address is This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. Please change your contacts lists if necessary. The previous email addresses no longer function. Read More
  • JEECS newsletter July 2018

    From Clive Bettington, JEECS chairman 1. Jewish traders of Petticoat LaneFrank Pittal, one of the last Jewish traders on the Lane, is organising a celebration of the market. Read More
  • Cable back issues available

    Back issues of JEECS’s magazine The Cable are still available at bargain prices. Over the years The Cable has provided a unique account of the people, culture, places and events that made the Jewish East End so vibrant. Read More
  • A fascinating book by a JEECS member

    JEECS member Vivi Lachs’ new book, Whitechapel Noise: Jewish Immigrant Life in Yiddish Song and Verse, London 1884–1914 is published this month (May). Read More
  • JEECS Newsletter March 29 2018

    1. Vanished works by a famous Japanese artist. 2. A quick reminder about the Rosenberg walk on Sunday April 1, now to be accompanied by a BBC journalist. 3. Jewish events in Tower Hamlets.   Read More
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