Jewish East End Celebration Society
P.O. Box 57317, London E1 3WG
enquiries@jeecs.org.uk

Michael Philip Davis, born Posimensky, came to the East End as a small child in the 1880s. Some 70 years later, he wrote a fascinating account of his early life, his eventually fulfilled dreams of settling in what would become Israel, and his first visit there. His great grandsons have kept his memory alive and Eliav Schmulewitz, one of them, contacted JEECS for help in tracking down more about his time in London. A posting on our Facebook page yielded at least one new discovery. Here below (unedited except for some explanatory additions in brackets) is Michael Davis’s account of his East End days, followed by some of Eliav’s findings and his request for further information. You can read more of Michael Davis’s own account on http://www.cabinetmaker.blogspot.co.il/.

The Jewish East End is to feature in a new Living History series on BBC television – and you could be part of it. Wall to Wall Television, the production company responsible for such hits as WhoDo You Think You Are?, Turn Back Time: The High Street, and the recent BBC2 series Back In Time For Dinner, is seeking people willing to relive the East End of the late Victorian era, including what assistant producer Emily Thompson calls the “rich story of the Jewish community living in these areas at the time”.

Fieldgate Street synagogue, which had been one of the last remaining active synagogues in the East End until relatively recently, has been bought by the adjacent East London Mosque.

A classic of Yiddish theatre has at last had its UK premiere – 109 years after it was written.

Treasure by David Pinski was staged  in English  at the multi-award-winning Finborough Theatre in Earl's Court, south-west London, for a four week season from Tuesday October 20 to Saturday November 14.

The glamorous world created by Boris, the iconic East End photographer whose life and work were featured in a recent issue of our magazine The Cable, is now the subject of a wonderful website, www.eastendvintageglamour.org.uk.

A theatre company in Boston in the US and an arts centre in Letchworth Garden City, Hertfordshire, have been brought together – thanks to a Cable article about the East End artist and poet Isaac Rosenberg.

Leah Lehrman was just 16 when she was killed while cycling from her East End home to central London and her job as a tailor. Now, 100 years after her death in one of the first Zeppelin raids of the First World War, her tomb has a memorial plaque after a 20-year search by her niece, Janet Foster, for the resting place of the aunt she never knew.

The life of Dora Diamant, a remarkable East Ender by adoption, was commemorated by JEECS on May 26 with a morning service at East Ham Jewish cemetery and an afternoon talk by Professor Kathi Diamant, her biographer, at Toynbee Hall.

"I feel completely overwhelmed by everything everybody has said today that has helped make this wonderful celebration of Bill's life. I know that Bill touched many lives in many ways and we all have our own memories of him. He was my best friend, my lover, my soul mate, he was just my Bill," said Doris Fishman at the end of a celebration honouring the life and work of her historian husband Professor Bill Fishman, honorary president of JEECS.

David Mazower's article (in issue 25 of The Cable) on the London Imperial Russian Singers was both interesting in its depiction of the choir and the psycho/social appeal it had to Jewish immigrants.

Victims of the last rocket attack on London were commemorated at a JEECS event on March 29 at Hughes Mansions in Vallance Road in Stepney, 70 years after the tragedy that left 134 people dead.

Over 100 JEECS members and Isaac Rosenberg aficionados gathered in St John’s Wood, north London,  on Sunday May 26 to celebrate the great East End artist and poet’s artistic and literary legacy in an event organised by JEECS with the Liberal Jewish Synagogue, who hosted this fantastic evening.

Latest news

  • Adam Zahn

    Can you help in uncovering information aboiut Adam Zahn, who lived in Bethnal Green in the early 1900s and owned a bakery? Read More
  • New book brings the 1930s and 1940s East End to life

      The lively Jewish East End community of the 1930s and 1940s is brought to life in a new book edited and translated by Yiddish scholar, musician and JEECS stalwart Vivi Lachs, with translations of stories and sketches by Katie Brown, A. M. Kaizer, and I. A. Lisky. Read More
  • East End-born author provides a sharp look at 18th century anti-Semitism with a modern resonance

    The saga of England’s so-called Jew Law of 1753, made law and then repealed within six months, is a little known episode in Anglo-Jewish history that nonetheless has considerable resonance today. It has now been brought into sharp focus in the latest book by East End born and bred Yoel Sheridan, (whom East End contemporaries may remember as Julius Shrensky, Read More
  • JEECS News Update: Jan 2022

    Holocaust Memorial Day Walk: January 30. Covid has ruled out the normal events in the East End this year. However I shall be doing my annual walk, The Jewish East End – World War 2 and the Holocaust, on Sunday January 30. This is a free event, but needs to be booked through my email, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..  We will meet at Aldgate Read More
  • Isaac Rosenberg: a great war poet for the 21st Century

    Born in Bristol but brought up in the East End, the multi-talented Isaac Rosenberg has been unduly neglected. Two of his biographers, Jean Liddiard and Jean Moorcroft Wilson, wrote articles for The Cable, the JEECS magazine, in 2006 and 2008 respectively aiming to redress the balance. Both are fascinating reads, and are now here on our website to mark the anniversary Read More
  • The Whitechapel of Isaac Rosenberg

    We have a fascinating guided walk on Sunday November 21 commemorating the great East End war poet and artist Isaac Rosenberg. The date is the closest Sunday to the anniversary of his birth in 1890. Read More
  • Banners commemorate Petticoat Lane’s past, present and future

    The revitalisation of Petticoat Lane, London’s oldest Sunday street market still in operation, continues apace with the unveiling next week of the community banners, commemorating many aspects of market life, along Wentworth Street and into Middlesex Street. Read More
  • Petticoat Lane captured on camera

    Petticoat Lane, on the edge of the East End, is London’s oldest existing Sunday street market. Over many decades, it played an important part in the life of Jewish London. Read More
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For the old Jeecs site, visit www.jeecs.org.uk/archive